Friday, September 25, 2009

Demographics of social networking

You might find this article interesting:

If you’re in the U.S. and are using a social network like Facebook, MySpace or LinkedIn, chances are you’re more affluent and more urban than the average American according to Nielsen Claritas, which provides in-depth segmentation analysis of consumer behavior.

The article goes on to compare some of the different social networking sites. The article is short on actual data (they want you to pay for that), but it does add to the conversation around inclusion as our media consumption shifts.

1 comment:

karen_w said...

This post writes "You might find this article interesting:

If you are in the U.S. and are using a social network like Facebook, MySpace or LinkedIn, chances are you’re more affluent and more urban than the average American according to Nielsen Claritas, which provides in-depth segmentation analysis of consumer behavior. "

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I find it interesting however you are correct it doesn't provide much data or facts to support it, other than generate more hits to the Nielsen website links.

Here is a contrary view on being "urban" and "affluent" (or not) from the local Pittsburgh community. The past week has been full of a different type of social "networking" in the Pittsburgh community branch libraries which are slated for cuts. Many less "affluent" urban neighborhoods cannot afford netbooks or mobile devices to connect outside of their local public library.

This article may also be of interest with more facts than Nielsen apparently can provide online. As information professionals, we should be good at evaluation all sources of information, I agree, rather than misinformation always / best karen w
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Carnegie board's vote provokes an uproar
Wed. Oct 7, 2009
Article in Post Gazette by Bob Hoover & Amy Schaarsmith, Pittsburgh Post Gazette

http://www.postgazette.com/pg/09280/1003521-53.stm?cmpid=relatedarticle


"...Even the Lawrenceville branch, the system's oldest that was opened in 1898 by Andrew Carnegie himself, was not protected from closure."

"Its building is ornately decorated with brick, stonework, wrought iron and floor-to-ceiling oak windows, and was designated a historic landmark by the Pittsburgh History and Landmarks Foundation. It has enjoyed double-digit growth in recent years, with nearly 50,000 people--many of whom walk from surrounding neighborhoods--using it last year." ...

..."Unlike wealthier neighborhoods where residents can afford to buy books, music,
and movies, Lawrenceville has many working-class residents who depend on the branch for those materials and can't necessarily reach East Liberty easily, said Laura Dabolish, 42. "

"It needs to stay open," said Ms. Dabolish, who uses the Lawrenceville branch on her way home to Franklin Park from work in Shadyside. "It has to stay open"